News in 2019

  • Breast screening film for women with learning difficulties 22 January 2020 A film made by and for wom-en with learning disabilities to take the fear out of going for breast screenings launched and premiered at North Bris-tol NHS Trust in November.
  • UK universities will work together to improve research quality and reproducibility 10 December 2019 UK universities will collaborate to improve the quality of UK academic research output. Whilst the UK is at the leading edge of research globally, there is a need to constantly strive to improve in order to retain that positions. Crucially, institutions must produce research that is rigorous, robust and of high-quality, to ensure that the UK retains its reputation for producing world-leading research.
  • Being active reduces risk of prostate cancer 5 December 2019 Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK*, yet we still don't know all of its causes. The largest ever study to use genetics as a measurement for physical activity to look at its effect on prostate cancer, reveals that being more active reduces the risk of prostate cancer. Over 140,000 men were included in the study, of which, 80,000 had prostate cancer.
  • Spin-out secures £1.1 million for ground-breaking 'supercharged' cell therapies to treat solid tumours 25 November 2019 A University of Bristol spin-out company has raised £1.1 million in funding to develop next generation cell therapies that could open new ways to treat solid tumours and improve the lives of 18 million people worldwide who are diagnosed with cancer each year.
  • Pioneering new ‘smart needle’ could revolutionise cancer diagnosis 11 November 2019 Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that can detect and diagnose one of the most common types of cancer within seconds - using light.
  • Researchers identify certain gut bacteria that may be involved in causing bowel cancer 4 November 2019 People who have a certain type of bacteria in their guts may be at greater risk of developing bowel cancer. The findings will be presented by University of Bristol researcher, Dr Kaitlin Wade, at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow today [Monday 4 November].
  • £18.5 million boost for South West biosciences 24 October 2019 PhD training across the biosciences has received a massive boost thanks to a £18.5 million funding award from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC, part of UK Research and Innovation) to the University of Bristol-led South West Biosciences Doctoral Training Partnership (SWBio DTP).
  • ICEP researchers identify key risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer 16 October 2019 Recent research led by ICEP researcher James Yarmolinksy found that only two of twelve previously-reported risk factors – a genetic tendency to endometriosis and smoking – actually increase the risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer.
  • £10 million funding boost for postgraduate biomedical sciences research 14 October 2019 The Wellcome Trust has awarded the University of Bristol over £10 million in funding for two prestigious PhD programmes in the faculties of Health Sciences and Life Sciences.
  • Scientists join forces to shed new light on ageing and wound healing 11 October 2019 Researchers from the Universities of Manchester and Bristol have been granted £4 million to investigate how cells govern the processes of ageing and wound healing and how this is influenced by the circadian (day/night) cycle. Their findings could help to improve wound healing and identify strategies to treat diseases like osteoarthritis.
  • Adult fly intestine could help understand intestinal regeneration 25 September 2019 Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are exposed to diverse types of environmental stresses such as bacteria and toxins, but the mechanisms by which epithelial cells sense stress are not well understood. New research by the universities of Bristol, Heidelberg and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have found that Nox-ROS-ASK1-MKK3-p38 signaling in IECs integrates various stresses to facilitate intestinal regeneration.
  • Risk of bias in evidence underpinning approval of new cancer drugs raises questions 23 September 2019 Around half of trials that supported new cancer drug approvals in Europe between 2014 and 2016 were judged to be at high risk of bias, a study published by the British Medical Journal (BMJ) has found. The research was led by the London School of Economics, with methodological input from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Bristol Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) and NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West (CLAHRC West).
  • Identifying risks and improving pregnancy care in childhood cancer survivors 17 September 2019 Thanks to improved survival and assisted fertility technologies like IVF, more women who had cancer treatment as a child or young adult are now able to have children. Unfortunately, evidence suggests that they are more likely to experience problems during pregnancy, including an increased risk of their babies being born prematurely. Dr Melanie Griffin of University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust is looking at the long-term impact of cancer treatment involving bone marrow transplantation on women’s reproductive health. She hopes to identify new ways to improve care for these childhood cancer survivors before and during their pregnancy, reducing the chances of their babies being born too soon.
  • Bristol immersive VR documentary to be shown at Venice Film Festival 13 September 2019 From Bristol to the big screens of Venice Film Festival, Virtual Reality film The Waiting Room, [commissioned by the Virtual Realities – Immersive Documentary Encounters research project] will be premiered at the annual event which starts today [28 August to 7 September] to a star-studded audience of cinema enthusiasts.
  • MRI assisted biopsies more effective at detecting prostate cancers 3 September 2019 Using MRI scans to target biopsies is more effective at detecting prostate cancers that are likely to need treatment than standard ultrasound guided biopsies alone, according to research published in JAMA Network Open. The research, led by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and Universities of Bristol, Ottawa, Exeter and Oxford, combined the results from seven studies covering 2,582 patients.
  • International collaborative projects win funding to tackle major health challenges 21 August 2019 Developing drugs to treat cancer and how sleep can support a healthy memory are two international collaborative projects led by academics at the University of Bristol that have been awarded major funding by the UK Research and Innovation's (UKRI) Fund for International Collaboration.
  • Genetic analyses indicate that the effect of being overweight and obesity on cancer risk is at least double than previously thought 14 August 2019 The effect of being overweight and obesity on risk of cancer is at least twice as large as previously thought according to new findings by an international research team which included University of Bristol academics.
  • Mendelian randomisation cancer and nutrition workshop 1 August 2019 The Mendelian randomisation cancer and nutrition workshop, hosted by the Integrative Cancer Epidemiology Programme (ICEP) in Bristol on 15 and 16 July, attracted 20 experts to assess and discuss the question: What are the challenges in nutritional cancer epidemiology and how can Mendelian randomization address them?
  • University Cancer Research Fund awards 31 July 2019 The University Cancer Re-search Fund (UCRF) seeks out the most innovative ideas in cancer research through an annual seed funding call.
  • James Yarmolinsky wins CRUK fellowship 30 July 2019 Integrative Cancer Epidemiology Programme (ICEP) researcher James Yarmolinsky has been awarded a CRUK 3-year fellowship, starting in October. The research will focus on "Evaluating the role of inflammation in cancer: robust target identification using genomic data."
  • Making the immune system better at recognising cancer 23 July 2019 A team at University of Bristol, led by Professor Linda Wooldridge, is engineering a type of immune cell that might be able to better target cancer cells. This could potentially lead to new therapies which could help the immune system combat cancer with fewer difficult interventions.
  • Understanding how cancer cells eat 16 July 2019 Meet Dr Emma Vincent as she tells us about her research and the artwork inspired by her work that reflects on the pathways that we and our cells can make
  • £9 million boost for health research in the west country 12 July 2019 Health researchers in the west country have been given a £9 million award from the Government's Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) to enable them to tackle the area's most pressing health problems. The funding will enable new research projects including forecasting demand in hospitals, increasing people's physical activity levels, supporting people who self-harm and improving outcomes for children in care.
  • University of Bristol awarded £100 million to drive 'tech for better futures' research 10 July 2019 A new £100 million institute, based in the centre of Bristol, is set to transform the way we create, utilise and evaluate new digital technologies to benefit our society now and in the future.
  • Understanding the unintended consequences of healthcare apps 9 July 2019 Dr Andrew Turner, Senior Research Associate, CLAHRC West, discusses the move towards ‘digital first’ care, the possible unintended consequences of healthcare apps, and how the DECODE study aims to improve the adoption of a range of digital health tools in primary care by understanding these unintended consequences.
  • Cancer Research UK’s obesity campaign 5 July 2019 Cancer Research UK (CR UK) states that their latest obesity campaign aims to stimulate a government policy response to ‘junk food’ advertising to children. Focusing on policy change rather than individual behaviour change is a laudable aim. However, the charity’s approach has been challenged by the public, researchers, and healthcare professionals.
  • Why we should be talking about bowel cancer 19 June 2019 Meet Professor Ann Williams who tells us about her research and the important message behind the Creative Reactions artwork inspired by her work.
  • GPs should not use inflammatory marker tests to rule out serious conditions 18 June 2019 Blood tests that detect inflammation, known as inflammatory marker tests, are not sensitive enough to rule out serious underlying conditions and GPs should not use them for this purpose, according to researchers from the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Exeter and the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West (NIHR CLAHRC West).
  • Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process 4 June 2019 Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells.
  • £6.6 million for major UK non-communicable disease prevention project 10 May 2019 The University of Bristol, in partnership with the Universities of Bath, West of England, Manchester, Reading and Cardiff and Bristol City Council and Greater Manchester Combined Authority, has been awarded £6.6 million by the UK Prevention Research Partnership (UKPRP) to tackle unhealthy urban planning and development linked to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as heart disease, obesity, poor mental health, cancer and diabetes.
  • CRUK-funded Cancer Policy Research Centre Innovation grant 1 May 2019 Congratulations to Caroline Wright, who is now Principal Investigator on a Cancer Research UK (CRUK)-funded Cancer Policy Research Centre (CPRC) Innovation grant. The 12-month £40 000 grant runts until February 2020.
  • Boost to Bristol’s research in Africa 29 April 2019 A generous £1 million gift from The Perivoli Trust will create new roles and opportunities for Bristol researchers to tackle key challenges and pioneer innovative solutions for the most pressing concerns on the continent.
  • Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues 23 April 2019 Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. The new method, pioneered by Dr Adam Perriman and colleagues, involves re-engineering the membranes of stem cells to effectively “weld” the cells together.
  • Technicians make it happen—Green Lab Accreditation 23 April 2019
  • Recognition in medicinal chemistry 1 April 2019 Prof Varinder Aggarwal of the School of Chemistry has been recognised for his work in the field of synthetic chemistry after being awarded the prestigious Yamada-Koga Prize 2019 from the University of Tokyo.
  • New Max Planck-Bristol Centre for Minimal Biology launched 29 March 2019 Building stripped-down versions of life using protocells, genome delivery systems and synthetic cytoskeletons comprise some of the groundbreaking research due to take place at a new Centre launched at the University of Bristol today [Wednesday 27 March]. The Max Planck-Bristol Centre for Minimal Biology, a partnership between the University of Bristol and the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science (MPG) in Germany, aims to advance the future of health and medicine by understanding the fundamental nature of life.
  • Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) 28 March 2019 The Elizabeth Blackwell Institute has appointed a new EDI Champion, Fiona McPhail, who took up her post in February 2019.
  • Gordon Research Conference on IGF and Insulin System in Physiology and Disease 19 March 2019 The Gordon Research Conference on IGF and Insulin System in Physiology and Disease too place in Ventura, California, USA, from 10 to 15 March 2019.
  • UK Research and Innovation Global Research Hubs 14 February 2019 Scientists from the University of Bristol will be sharing their expertise as part of two new £20 million UK Research and Innovation Global Research Hubs funded through the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). The first will focus on urban disaster risk and the second aims to tackle the challenge that nitrogen pollution poses for the environment, food security, human health and the economy in South Asia.
  • 2019 Hooke Medal of the British Society of Cell Biology 14 February 2019 Eugenia Piddini, Professor of Cell Biology and Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, has been awarded the 2019 Hooke Medal in recognition of her outstanding contribution to cell biology and as an emerging leader in this field.
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